Five Action Steps for Helping Someone in Emotional Pain

Each year millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental illness. During Mental Health Awareness Month in May, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and other organizations and individuals across the U.S. focus on raising awareness of mental health. Each year they help fight stigma, provide support, educate the public and advocate for policies that support people with mental illness and their families. Learn more about the resources and information available to help promote Mental Health Awareness by clicking here

In 2017, suicide claimed the lives of more than 47,000 people in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Suicide affects people of all ages, genders, races, and ethnicities.

Suicide is complicated and tragic, but it can be preventable. Knowing the warning signs for suicide and how to get help can help save lives.

5 steps you can take to #BeThe1To help someone in emotional pain

ASK: “Are you thinking about killing yourself?” It’s not an easy question but studies show that asking at-risk individuals if they are suicidal does not increase suicides or suicidal thoughts.

KEEP THEM SAFE: Reducing a suicidal person’s access to highly lethal items or places is an important part of suicide prevention. While this is not always easy, asking if the at-risk person has a plan and removing or disabling the lethal means can make a difference.

BE THERE: Listen carefully and learn what the individual is thinking and feeling. Research suggests acknowledging and talking about suicide may in fact reduce rather than increase suicidal thoughts.

HELP THEM CONNECT: Save the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s number in your phone so it’s there when you need it: 1-800-273-TALK (8255). You can also help make a connection with a trusted individual like a family member, friend, spiritual advisor, or mental health professional.

STAY CONNECTED: Staying in touch after a crisis or after being discharged from care can make a difference. Studies have shown the number of suicide deaths goes down when someone follows up with the at-risk person.

For more information on suicide prevention: www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/suicide-prevention.

Source: www.bethe1to.com

US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH Publication No. OM 18-4315, Revised 2019

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